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Past Featured Event

'The new renaissance: hope in an uncertain age' with Prof Ian Goldin



This book talk is part of the FT Weekend Oxford Literary Festival 2017, the Oxford Martin School is the Festival Ideas Partner

Professor Ian Goldin, Professor of Globalisation and Development, Senior Fellow at the Oxford Martin School, says a new Renaissance offers hope for our world, and reflects on Brexit, Donald Trump’s victory in the US elections and the dangers we face if we do not create more inclusive societies at a time of tumultuous change.

This is a ticketed event and the tickets are £12.50. For more information and to purchase a ticket please visit this website: www.ticketsource.co.uk/date/322228


About the speaker

Professor Ian Goldin

Professor Ian Goldin was the founding Director of the Oxford Martin School from September 2006 to September 2016. He is currently Oxford University Professor of Globalisation and Development, Senior Fellow at the Oxford Martin School, Director of the Oxford Martin Progamme on Technological and Economic Change and a Professorial Fellow at the University’s Balliol College.

During his decade as Director the School established 45 programmes of research, bringing together more than 500 academics from across Oxford, from over 100 disciplines, and becoming the world’s leading centre for interdisciplinary research into critical global challenges.

Professor Goldin initiated and was Vice-Chair of the Oxford Martin Commission for Future Generations, which brought together international leaders from government, business, academia, media and civil society to address the growing short-term preoccupations of modern politics and business, and identify ways of overcoming today’s gridlock in key international negotiations. The Commission's report, Now for the Long Term, was published in October 2013.

From 2003 to 2006 he was Vice President of the World Bank, and prior to that the Bank’s Director of Development Policy (2001-2003). He served on the Bank’s senior management team and led the Bank’s collaboration with the United Nations and other partners as well as with key countries. As Director of Development Policy, he played a pivotal role in the research and strategy agenda of the Bank.

From 1996 to 2001 he was Chief Executive and Managing Director of the Development Bank of Southern Africa and served as an advisor to President Nelson Mandela. He succeeded in transforming the Bank to become the leading agent of development in the 14 countries of Southern Africa. During this period, Goldin served on several Government committees and Boards, and was Finance Director for South Africa’s Olympic Bid.

Previously, Goldin was Principal Economist at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) in London, and Program Director at the OECD Development Centre in Paris, where he directed the Programs on Trade, Environment and Sustainable Development.

He has a BA (Hons) and a BSc from the University of Cape Town, an MSc from the London School of Economics, and an MA and Doctorate from the University of Oxford.

Goldin has received wide recognition for his contributions to development and research, including having been knighted by the French Government and nominated Global Leader of Tomorrow by the World Economic Forum. He has published over 50 articles and 20 books - more information can be found at iangoldin.org

About the book

Book CoverThe present is a contest between the bright and dark sides of discovery. To avoid being torn apart by its stresses, we need to recognize the fact-and gain courage and wisdom from the past. Age of Discovery shows how. Now is the best moment in history to be alive, but we have never felt more anxious or divided. Human health, aggregate wealth and education are flourishing. Scientific discovery is racing forward. But the same global flows of trade, capital, people and ideas that make gains possible for some people deliver big losses to others-and make us all more vulnerable to one another. Business and science are working giant revolutions upon our societies, but our politics and institutions evolve at a much slower pace. That's why, in a moment when everyone ought to be celebrating giant global gains, many of us are righteously angry at being left out and stressed about where we're headed. To make sense of present shocks, we need to step back and recognize: we've been here before. The first Renaissance, the time of Columbus, Copernicus, Gutenberg and others, likewise redrew all maps of the world, democratized communication and sparked a flourishing of creative achievement.


This event is part of a series:

Oxford Martin School at the FT Weekend Oxford Literary Festival 2017

In 2017, following three successful years working together, the Oxford Martin School is pleased to once again be acting as Festival Ideas Partner to the Financial Times Weekend Oxford Literary Festival. Throughout the festival from 25 March - 2 April, the School will host a wide range of Festival lectures and events, including book talks from academics working at the Oxford Martin School.&...


Event Details

26 March 2017 14:00 - 15:00

More Information


Location

Lecture Theatre, Oxford Martin School

34 Broad Street (corner of Holywell and Catte Streets)
Oxford
OX1 3BD