News

Only 1 in 10 of the world’s largest energy companies have made plans to get to net-zero emissions

Just 13 out of the largest 132 coal, electricity, and oil and gas companies have made commitments to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions to net zero, according to research published today by the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at the London School of Economics and Political Science, the Oxford Martin School, and the Transition Pathway Initiative.

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The Oxford Martin School: finding new ways to tackle global challenges

Dr James Martin had a vision for inspiring the best minds in academia to work together on the world’s major problems. To make this a reality, nearly fifteen years ago he gave what was at the time the largest philanthropic donation in Oxford’s history, to establish the Oxford Martin School: a vehicle, unique to Oxford, which channels, cross-fertilises and catalyses ideas across disciplines, with the ambition of creating real-world solutions.

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Capturing carbon dioxide to make useful products could become big business, finds study

CO2 utilisation has the potential to operate at large scale and at low cost, meaning it could form part of a viable new global industry.

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International neglect of typhoid outside rich countries threatens a new global health emergency

The emergence of untreatable strains of typhoid threatens a new global health emergency that requires urgent collective action, argue experts from the Oxford Martin School in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases today.

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Eating more fruits, vegetables, nuts and wholegrains is a win-win for health and the environment

New analysis by researchers from the University of Oxford and the University of Minnesota, published today in the journal PNAS, has identified a range of ‘win-win’ foods that both improve human health and have a low impact on the environment.

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Oxford Martin School expands latest funding round and extends deadline

We currently have an open call for research on technological solutions and their barriers. We are pleased to announce that we are expanding this call to include another competition, to fund a single Oxford Martin School Programmet that is 100% compliant with the UK’s Official Development Assistance (ODA).

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Major European Research Council Synergy funding win for economic inequality project

Professor Brian Nolan, of the Department of Social Policy and Intervention and Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School, has been announced today as one of the winners of a prestigious European Research Council Synergy grant.

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Methods developed in economics show variation in uptake of prescribing guidance by GPs

Researchers from the University of Oxford’s Evidence Based Medicine Data Lab, the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET) at the Oxford Martin School, and the University of Victoria, Canada studied the prescriptions made by nearly all general practitioners in the UK to find out how quickly their prescribing behaviour changed when new guidelines were issued.

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Is mandatory vaccination the best way to tackle falling rates of childhood immunisation?

Following the publication of figures showing UK childhood vaccination rates have fallen for the fifth year in a row, researchers from the Oxford Martin Programme on Collective Responsibility for Infectious Disease discuss possible responses.

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Vegetarian and pescetarian diets linked to lower risk of coronary heart disease, says study

Vegetarian (including vegan) and pescetarian diets may be linked to a lower risk of coronary heart disease, or CHD for short, than diets that include meat, suggest the findings of a large UK study published in The BMJ today.

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'To meet Paris Agreement targets, focus on warming, not emissions'

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Heart failure care must address broader health to improve survival rates, says study

Research published in JAMA Cardiology today presents new evidence that might explain why the prognosis of heart failure patients has improved so little over the past decade.

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Why we can’t just blame rising inequality for the growth of populism around the world

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